Hawke Conversation Series

With Tariq Ali, internationally acclaimed writer and commentator

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Friday 8 October 2010, 12.00pm

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Hawke Research Institute

Bradley Forum, UniSA City West campus, Hawke Building level 5, 50-55 North Terrace, Adelaide

Jointly presented by the Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre and the Hawke Research Institute

This series enables us to extend our thinking about topics that emanate from a more globalised world view. Among the topics in the spotlight are: Race, Diaspora and Postcolonial Studies; New Media and Technologies; and, Globalization Studies and Education.

Prepare to be involved in an in-depth session lasting approximately one hour.

Join Tariq Ali, In Conversation with Professor Pal Ahluwalia, UNESCO Chair in Transnational Diasporas and Reconciliation Studies and a Pro-Vice Chancellor at UniSA

Tariq Ali (credit Nina Subin)TARIQ ALI is an internationally acclaimed writer and commentator working in theatre, film and as an author of published works. He was a leading figure of the European Left during the 60s and 70s and was the inspiration for John Lennon's song, Power to the People, and The Rolling Stones' Street Fighting Man. An exile from his native Pakistan as a critic of the military regime, he has written a number of books on world history and politics including his bestselling Clash of the Fundamentalisms, and later, The Obama Syndrome. He is an Editor of New Left Review. His award winning Muslim Quintet and his Fall-of-Communism trilogy are among fictional works that have distinguished him in the world of writing.

Ali is also a celebrated filmmaker and has written scripts for the stage and screen. Recently, he has worked with Oliver Stone for his new documentary about the relationship between Latin America and the US South of the Border.

Professor Pal Ahluwalia is Pro Vice Chancellor and Vice President of Education Arts and Social Sciences at the University of South Australia. He is the author of many books and articles and was appointed a UNESCO Chair in Transnational Diasporas and Reconciliation Studies in 2008. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. His most recent book is Out of Africa: Post-structuralism's Colonial Roots published with Routledge. He is the co-editor of three Routledge journals: Social Identities, African Identities and Sikh Formations.

More about Tariq Ali

  • Tariq Ali was born in Lahore (then in British India) in 1943. He was educated in Pakistan and later at Oxford.
  • His opposition to the Military dictatorship in Pakistan prevented his return to his own country and he became an unwilling exile in Britain.
  • He is a longstanding editor of the celebrated journal New Left Review, which is celebrating it quinquagenary in 2010, and writes for The Guardian and the London Review of Books. As a leading public intellectual of the Left he is much in demand and travels frequently to every continent.
  • He was a leading figure of the European Left during the 60s and 70s and was the inspiration for John Lennon's song, Power to the People, and The Rolling Stones', Street Fighting Man. In 1966, he debated Henry Kissinger and others in the first ever satellite transmission TV debate organised by CBS and received a fan letter and invitation to dinner from Marlon Brando. During this time he edited two iconic radical magazines of the period, The Black Dwarf and The Red Mole, which combined politics and culture and whose contributors included John Lennon and Mick Jagger.
  • He has written over two dozen books on history, politics and biography, which were translated into many languages. These include: Can Pakistan Survive? (1984) The Nehrus and the Gandhis: An Indian Dynasty (1985), Streetfighting Years: An Autobiography of the Sixties (1988), The Duel: Pakistan on the Flightpath of American Power (2008), The Idea of Communism, The Clash of Fundamentalisms (2002), Bush in Babylon: Recolonising Iraq (2003), Pirates of the Caribbean: Axis of Hope (2006) and Protocols of the Elders of Sodom (2009).
  • Tariq Ali is a filmmaker as well as a scriptwriter for film, stage and television. He co-wrote Oliver Stone's South of the Border (2010), which was based on his book Pirates of the Caribbean. He collaborated with Derek Jarman in the film Wittgenstein, wrote Parition for Ken McMullen and produced Big Women a four-part drama series by Fay Weldon for Channel Four Television in Britain.
  • In the 80s Tariq Ali concentrated on film-making for Channel Four, pioneering programmes such as Bandung File (world affairs) and Rear Window (Culture) as well as numerous other critical documentaries. His television company Bandung Productions was well-established as a producer of quality documentaries and drama until he closed it down in 1998 - because British television had become 'a brothel'.
  • In 2007, he was commissioned by the BBC to write a three-part script but this courted censorship when the BBC refused to put The Leopard and the Fox, about the life and death of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, into production.
  • Recently, Tariq Ali has worked with Oliver Stone for his new documentary about the relationship between Latin America and the US South of the Border.
  • In 1990 he began to write fiction, working concurrently on two different sets of novels: the 'Fall-of-Communism trilogy' and the 'Islam Quintet'. The first includes Redemption and Fear of Mirrors. The second consists of Shadows of the Pomegranate Tree, an account of the decline of Muslim civilisation in Spain which was awarded the Archbishop San Clemente del Instituto Rosalia de Castro Prize for the Best Foreign Language Fiction published in Spain in 1994. It was followed by The Book of Saladin and The Stone Woman and, most recently A Sultan in Palermo. Each of the novels has been translated into several languages.
  • In January 2010 he was awarded the Granadillo Prize by the Cultural Festival of Granada for the 'Islam Quintet'.
  • His theatrical interventions have usually been in collaboration with Howard Brenton: Iranian Nights (on the Rushdie Affair), Moscow Gold (an epic on Gorbachev and the fall of Communism), Ugly Rumours (a satire of New Labour), Collateral Damage (The Balkan War) and Snogging Ken (another broadside against New Labour). A theatrical solo by Ali was Necklaces a plea against violence in South Africa and lately a satirical assault on Blair in An Illustrious Corpse, 2003.
  • Most recently Tariq Ali was commissioned to write a play with the Norwegian author Thorvald Stee for the House of Literature in Oslo. In March 2010, with the help of Norway's most renowned stage director Stein Winge and a cast of six outstanding actors, the play Desert Storms, ran as the first major scale theatre performance at the venue, portraying Saladin's conflict with Richard The Lion Heart during the crusades.

 

The Hawke Centre and Hawke Research Institute are pleased to present a series of Conversations between academic leaders at UniSA and visiting scholars and experts.  This series commenced in 2009 and will continue over two years.

This series will enable us to extend our thinking about topics that emanate from a more globalised world view. Among the topics in the spotlight are: Race, Diaspora and Postcolonial Studies; New Media and Technologies; and, Globalization Studies and Education.   If you are interested in attending, prepare to be involved in an in-depth session lasting approximately one hour.

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