Glossary of University terms

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This glossary is managed by the SAS policy team. Please send feedback or requests for new entries or amendments to SASPolicyTeam@unisa.edu.au.

You my also find the Glossary of Financial Terms useful. In addition, most University policies contain a 'Definitions' section.  


A

Academic Board

The principal academic advisory body to University Council. The primary role and functions of Academic Board are set out in the Academic Board Charter (Word doc).

Academic developer

A member of University staff who contributes to the development of programs.

Academic dress

The components of dress all graduates are required to wear at a graduation ceremony.  The academic dress of the University of South Australia is:

  • Doctor of Philosophy: Oxford style black gown with red facing on the front of the gown and around the sleeve cuffs.  Black Oxford style hood, fully lined with red, and edged with gold.  Black Tudor velvet bonnet with black tassel.

  • Professional Doctorates: Oxford style black gown faced with discipline colour (as per undergraduate degree) on front of gown and around sleeve cuffs.  Black Oxford style hoods, lined with discipline colour, and edged with gold. Black Tudor velvet bonnet with black tassel.

  • Masters: Oxford style black gown.  Black Oxford style hood, fully lined with blue, and edged with gold.  Black mortarboard with black tassel.

  • Graduate Diplomas: Cambridge style black gown.  Red stole with gold edging and two stripes.

  • Graduate Certificates: Cambridge style black gown. Blue stole with gold edging and one stripe.

  • Undergraduate Degrees: Cambridge style black gown. Black mortarboard with black tassel.  Black Oxford style hood, fully lined, with discipline colour.

  • Undergraduate Diplomas: Cambridge style black gown. Gold stole with blue edging.

Academic Integrity

The University aims to foster and preserve the scholarly values of curiosity, experimentation, critical appraisal and integrity, and to foster these values in its students. Throughout their learning experience, students are encouraged to work collaboratively. However it is important that students understand the difference between collaboration and collusion. Students are expected to adhere to high standards of academic integrity and honesty at all times. Failure to do so may constitute academic misconduct.

For more information see Section 9 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual or the UniSA Academic Integrity website.

Academic misconduct

Includes:

  1. plagiarism

  2. submitting substantially the same work for multiple assessments. This includes work submitted for a UniSA course or any other course at another educational provider. If a course coordinator specifically allows this practice, it will be clearly identified in the course outline

  3. breaches of the examination procedures as set out in Section 6 of this APPM

  4. presentation of data with respect to laboratory work, clinical placements, practicums, field trips or other work, that has been copied, falsified or in any other way obtained improperly

  5. inclusion of material in individual work that has involved significant assistance from another person, where such assistance is not expressly permitted in the course outline

  6. seeking or providing assistance to a student in the presentation of individual work, where such assistance is not expressly permitted in the course outline

  7. falsification or misrepresentation of academic records, or any other document submitted in relation to an academic program, and

  8. any other actions that contravene the principles of academic integrity 

For more information see Section 9 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Academic plan

An area of specialisation within an academic program (e.g. Applied Geology within the Bachelor of Applied Science) and generally takes the form of a specified sequence of courses to be undertaken within that program. See Specialisation.

Academic policies

Formally authorised statements of the principles and actions required to support teaching and learning activities at UniSA.

Academic review

At the end of each academic review period, the academic progress of each student is assessed using specific criteria to identify students who are making unsatisfactory progress. This is called 'academic review'.

Students are identified as 'making unsatisfactory progress' if they:

  1. fail a course for the second time; or

  2. fail courses in an academic review period, resulting in a grade point average for that period of less than 2.80; or

  3. fail a practicum, field, or clinical placement, where that failure constitutes failure in the course

For more information see Section 10 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Academic review period

The group of study periods from which results are collated to systematically identify students who are making unsatisfactory progress.

  • The mid-year review period (July) includes Study Periods 6 and 7 from the previous academic year and Study Periods 1 and 2 from the current academic year.

  • The end-of-year review period (December) includes Study Periods 3, 4 and 5 from the current academic year.

Divisions may approve the use of an alternate academic review period where applicable (e.g. for accelerated programs).

Academic standing

A student's academic progress in a program and the outcomes of the formal review of progress undertaken as part of the University's academic review process.

Accelerated Mode

A form of program delivery which allows students to undertake and complete a program in a shorter period of time than the standard schedule allows for.

Accrediting body

A professional association which formally accredits programs within a particular discipline. In some cases it may be a statutory body which has been established for this purpose, and which has responsibility for administering the legislation that controls the registration and practice of the profession.

Advisory Structures

Includes established advisory groups and occasional advisory meetings with stakeholders about particular issues.

Advisory structures provide:

  • independent expert external advice to individuals and groups responsible for decisions about educational and research programs

  • advice about relevant trends in the demand for graduates and the graduate qualities required by employers and the community

  • comment on the structure and content of existing programs under review, and on proposed new programs (in accordance with the Coursework Program Approval Manual), and

  • advice on research trends and strategic opportunities for research

For more information see policy A-38: Advisory Structures.

Amendment

A formally approved change to a program, course, major, sub-major or minor.

Area code

At UniSA, all courses are allocated an 'area code' and a 'catalogue number' for administrative purposes. For example, the course Chemistry 101 might be allocated 'CHEM 1007'. The alpha component 'CHEM' represents the discipline area and is the area code for this course. The numerical component '1007' is the catalogue number for this course.

Articulation

The specific design of education and training programs to facilitate and maximise opportunities for students to proceed from one level of education/training to the next.

Articulation Agreement

An arrangement where a program has been specifically designed to facilitate and maximise opportunities for credit transfer and/or for students to proceed from one level of education to the next (for example a specifically designed pathway from an offshore diploma level program to a UniSA degree program).

Assessment

A measurement of a student's skill and knowledge. For more information see Section 1 and Definitions section in the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Associate degree

A sub-degree award conferred following the satisfactory completion of an academic program normally of at least two years full-time duration.

Assumed knowledge

Knowledge that students are assumed to have  in a particular subject area prior to enrolling into a program. Assumed knowledge is an advantage but not essential for entry into a program. .

Audit enrolment

A type of single course enrolment in which attendance in a course is for information only. Audit students may attend lectures, but attendance at tutorials and practical sessions will be subject to the permission of the course coordinator. Completion of the course does not count towards a program. For more information see policy A-48: Enrolment.

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR)

 A rank out of 99.95 which indicates how a student has performed in Year 12. Every UniSA program has a ‘cut off score’ which is the minimum ATAR a student must achieve to gain entry into a program for which they have applied.

Award

The qualification conferred upon a student following the successful completion of an academic program. The categories of award include: Associate Degree, Diploma, Bachelor Degree, Honours Degree, Degree with Honours, Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Master Degree (both coursework and research), Doctoral Degree (both coursework and research) and Higher Doctorate.


B

Bachelor degree

An undergraduate award of three or more years of full-time or equivalent part-time study.

Bachelor Double Degree programs

Must be at least 4 academic years (144 units) of full-time study (or equivalent). For example:

  • combining two 3-year awards would create a 4-year (144 units) double degree

  • combining a 4-year and a 3-year award would create a 5-year (180 units) double degree

For more information see the Coursework Program Approval Manual.

Bilingual print dictionary

A dictionary that translates words or phrases from one language to another without providing a definition of the word in either language. A bilingual dictionary can be either 'mono-directional', meaning it translates only from language A to language B, or 'bi-directional', meaning it translates to and from both languages.

Block credit

Credit granted as recognition of successfully completed periods of equivalent study. Block credit is expressed in units. Such credit is particularly applicable to programs which are highly structured and have few or no electives, as with many professional disciplines where programs are fairly uniform across Australia. For more information see policy A-13: Recognition of prior learning.



C

Campus

The physical location from where a program of study is being delivered. The University has five campuses. These are: City West, City East, Mawson Lakes, Magill, and Whyalla.

Capstone project

An opportunity within a program for students to gain valuable on-the-job skills and experience in preparation for the workplace.

Case study

An applied form of study involving an intensive, detailed description and analysis of a single project or program in the context of its environment. Case studies are common in the Business and Management disciplines.

Catalogue number

At UniSA courses are allocated an 'area code' and a 'catalogue number' for administrative purposes. For example the course Chemistry 101 might be allocated 'CHEM 1007'. The alpha component 'CHEM' represents the discipline area and is the area code for this course. The numerical component '1007' is the catalogue number for this course.

Census date

The date within each study period by which a student's enrolment must be finalised for a course and applicable fees and charges are incurred. It is the last day on which a student can withdraw from a course and have it deleted from their academic record.

Certificate IV (sometimes known as an ‘advanced certificate’) 

This is a type of qualification recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework. It is one of the minimum requirements for entry to University programs (see policy A-18: Selection and entry to programs.

Chancellor's Letters of Commendation

Awarded annually to students with outstanding academic performance in an undergraduate program. Receipt of a Chancellor's Letter of Commendation will be recorded on the student's academic transcript. For more information see policy A-50: Coursework Scholarships and Prizes.

Clinical placement

Provides students with direct education and valuable exposure to professional practice in both metropolitan and rural settings. They are a core element of many of the programs offered by the Division of Health Sciences.

Closed book

An examination where no written or printed materials or other aids are allowed in. No electronic devices are allowed.

Co-badged program

A collaborative arrangement between recognised education providers, resulting in a single award and may include the co-badging of a single testamur. The inclusion of another university's details on University of South Australia parchments must be approved by Academic Board and University Council.

Cohort

A group of students that commences a particular program of study in a particular year.

Commencing student

A student who has enrolled in a program for the first time between 1 January and 31 December of a given year.

Common core course

Courses that are common to multiple academic programs or specialisations within a school or division. See Core course.

Commonwealth Assistance Form (CAF)

Students who are enrolled in a Commonwealth Supported Place, or who are requesting assistance under the Higher Education Loan Programme (HELP), must complete a Commonwealth Assistance Form (CAF). For more information please email student_finance@unisa.edu.au.

Commonwealth Assistance Notice (CAN) 

A notice that contains information about a student's enrolment and use of Commonwealth assistance. A CAN is issued to students who are Commonwealth supported and have sought HELP assistance.

Commonwealth Assisted Student

Students who receive a Commonwealth loan (via the HELP program), or a Commonwealth Learning Scholarship (CLS). Students must be Australian citizens, or holders of permanent humanitarian visas to be eligible for Commonwealth assistance. Holders of non-humanitarian permanent visas and New Zealand citizens are not eligible for Commonwealth assistance but may be eligible as domestic students for a Commonwealth supported place. For more information see policy A-47 Student fees and loans or contact Student Finance email: student_finance@unisa.edu.au.

Commonwealth contributions

Contributions that the Commonwealth makes towards the cost of a student's education through the Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS).

Commonwealth Grants Scheme (CGS)

A scheme whereby the Commonwealth provides funding to higher education providers for Commonwealth supported places (CSPs) in bachelor programs and some sub-bachelor, non research postgraduate, medicine and other courses of study specified by the Minister.

Commonwealth Scholarships

A Commonwealth program which aims to facilitate choice in higher education and to increase participation by students from low socio-economic backgrounds, particularly indigenous students and students from rural and regional areas. For more information see Scholarships at UniSA.

Commonwealth Supported Place (CSP)

A higher education place for which the Commonwealth makes a financial contribution under the Act (HESA 2003). Domestic undergraduate places at UniSA  are generally Commonwealth supported. Postgraduate coursework places can be offered on a full fee-paying basis or as Commonwealth supported places.

An Australian citizen will not be eligible for a CSP or the HELP schemes where UniSA reasonably expects that the student will not undertake any courses forming part of their program of study in Australia.

Commonwealth Supported Student

A student who is eligible for and enrolled in a Commonwealth supported place. Commonwealth supported students do not pay tuition fees, but are charged a student contribution amount towards the cost of their program, and a student services and amenities fee.

To be eligible for a Commonwealth supported place, a student must be a domestic student, undertaking part of their program of study in Australia.  Australian permanent visa holders and New Zealand citizens must reside in Australia for the duration of their studies.

Community service

Non-academic activities that impose some restriction on a student's capacity to participate in, or complete an assessment requirement (e.g. elite athletes, jury duty and Defence forces leave). For more information see Section 3 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Computer practical

A learning opportunity which takes place in a computer pool. There is usually a brief presentation by the lecturer or tutor followed by students completing set exercises. Computer practicals provide opportunities for interaction and discussion with the lecturer or tutor and fellow students.

Conceded Pass (CP)

A final grade which allows a course to be included in the student's progression through their program and to be used as a prerequisite. For more information see Section 8 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Conferral

Conferral is the date on which an academic qualification is granted. This date appears on the student's official parchment.

Conferred 'in absentia'

This is where an award is conferred on a graduand at a graduation ceremony which they do not attend.

Confirmation of Enrolment (CoE)

A form issued by the University to international students studying in Australia on a student visa, for student visa purposes.

Contact time

The number of hours per week a student is required to attend face to face learning (e.g. in tutorials, lectures, workshops and practical sessions). See also Non-contact time.

Continuing student

All students who are not a commencing student.

Continuous assessment tasks

These occur within regularly scheduled class time and do not require any additional preparation time other than what would normally be expected for class participation. A course may have a number of these tasks during the study period. Collectively these are known as 'a set of continuous assessment tasks'.  For more information see Section 1 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Core course

A compulsory course within an academic program or specialisation designed to provide essential skills, knowledge and understanding in the field of study.

Corequisite

A course that must be undertaken before or at the same time as another course. Corequisites are listed on the course home page.

Course

At UniSA, a course is the basic component of an academic program. A course is identified by a course name (e.g. Chemistry 101), an area and catalogue number (e.g. CHEM 1007) and a course ID (e.g. 10908). Courses are usually 4.5 units, with a unit representing a minimum of 35 hours of student work, including both contact time and non-contact time. A full-time student will usually enrol in four courses per half year of study. See also Common core course, Core course.

Course coordinator

The academic staff member responsible for the academic management of a particular course.

Course Corequisite

A course which must be taken at the same time as another course in a particular study area. Corequisites are listed on the course home page.

Course ID

A unique six digit code assigned to each course and used to identify the course on the University’s record system.

Course Offering

The ways in which the University makes a course available to students. A course offering will involve a combination of the following attributes:

  • Mode of delivery

  • Location

  • Partner (where applicable)

  • Language

  • Intensive

NB: A separate course outline is required for each course offering.

Course Outline

Contains all the teaching, learning and administrative information required by students undertaking a course. A course outline is required for all courses. It is prepared and provided for students. Section 2 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual specifies the required content of a Course Outline.

Course ownership

Courses are owned by schools within the University.  A course may be owned by more than one school, however there must always be a primary owner. Course ownership means responsibility for the academic management of the course.

Course Prerequisite

A course or group of courses which must be successfully completed prior to undertaking a more advanced course.  Prerequisites are listed on the course home page.

Coursework scholarship

An award selected on merit, including but not limited to academic merit, to assist a student to undertake or complete a program of study at the University over a nominated period of time, in accordance with the selection criteria. A scholarship may take the form of periodic payments to the student or a reduction in specified costs such as tuition fees for the duration of the scholarship. For more information see policy A-50: Coursework Prizes and Scholarships.

Credit

The term 'credit' is used in two ways at the University:

  • a grade awarded for an assessment task (e.g. C = Credit); or

  • the recognition of prior learning granted towards the requirements of an award program at the University on the basis of prior study or prior work and/or life experience

Credit Assessor

A data base that lists clear precedent for credit arrangements and formal credit transfer agreements between UniSA and other education and training providers in Australia and internationally.

CRICOS code     

A code which is allocated to all programs available to international students which are:

  • approved by the relevant State or Territory accreditation authority, and

  • listed on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS)

Criterion referenced assessment

The assessment of student performance against pre-determined criteria related to the learning outcomes of the course. For more information see the Definitions section in the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Cross institutional enrolment

This is where the student is enrolled in an academic program at one educational institution (the home institution) and is permitted by that institution to enrol in courses at another recognised educational institution (the host institution) which will be counted towards an award at the home institution.

  • Incoming cross-institutional enrolment means enrolment by a student in one or more UniSA courses that will be credited to their program at another registered provider (the 'home provider'), as agreed to by UniSA and the home provider.

  • Outgoing cross-institutional enrolment means enrolment by a UniSA student in one or more courses at another registered provider (the 'host provider') that will be credited to their program at UniSA, as agreed to by UniSA and the host provider. For more information see policy A-48: Enrolment.


D

Deferred assessment

A form of secondary assessment which is granted to students who have been unable to complete the final assessment/examination, to assist them to achieve a final grade in a course. For more information see Section 7 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Degree with honours

Programs of four or more years in duration which include a minimum of one year of advanced studies for students who demonstrate a high level of achievement in the initial years of the program. Students who fail to meet the necessary grade point average for the honours stream continue with the pass degree. For more information see policy A-42: Honours Degree Programs.

Diploma

A sub-degree award that is conferred following the satisfactory completion of an academic program of at least one or two year's full-time duration.

Directed study

A course in which a student works under the direction of an academic staff member in a subject area which is relevant to their program and in which they have a particular interest.

Disability

Defined in the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cwth) as:

  • total or partial loss of the person's bodily or mental functions

  • total or partial loss of a part of the body

  • the presence in the body of organisms causing disease or illness

  • the presence in the body of organisms capable of causing disease or illness

  • the malfunction, malformation or disfigurement of a part of the person's body

  • a disorder or malfunction that results in the person learning differently from a person without the disorder or malfunction

  • a disorder, illness or disease that affects a person's thought processes, perception of reality, emotions or judgment or that results in disturbed behaviour 

It includes a disability that presently exists, or previously existed but no longer exists, or may exist in the future, or is imputed to a person. For more information about University policy and procedures relating to disability, see policy C-7: Students with disabilities.

Discipline Sequence

The sequencing of courses within a program to reflect increasing complexity in content, demands in the assessment and, in some cases, prerequisite requirements.  This is required for compliance with the Australian Qualifications Framework. In many UniSA programs a discipline sequence constitutes a major within the program.

Distance Education

Study undertaken externally. Some external courses include an internal component.

Doctoral degree (PhD)

An award conferred following the satisfactory completion of an original research project which is comprehensive in both theory and practice, and results in a significant contribution to knowledge or understanding and/or the application of knowledge within the field of study. Leads to the award of Doctor of Philosophy.

Domestic students

Australian citizens, New Zealand citizens or holders of an Australian permanent visa.  Holders of an Australian permanent visa and New Zealand Citizens  must reside in Australia for the duration of their studies in order to be eligible for enrolment as a Commonwealth supported student.

Double degree

A program where two contrasting and complementary programs at the same level have been combined to complement each other, such that the core elements of the two awards are undertaken simultaneously and the requirements of each award are fully met.

Double degree programs are permitted at bachelor and masters degree level only. At masters level double degrees would normally only apply to 54 unit and 72 unit programs. Double degree structures do not apply to graduate certificate or graduate diploma programs due to the structure and duration of such programs. See Bachelor Double Degree programs and Masters Level Double Degrees.

Dual language program

An offshore program that uses English and a language other than English (LOTE) as the language of instruction and a medium to acquire disciplinary knowledge and skills in the development of the Graduate Qualities. This model requires a degree of proficiency in English and recognises the first language background of the learner.


E

Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Framework

A legislative framework which includes the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000 (Cwth), regulations and related legislation, and the National Code 2007.

Effective dating

Data in the student record system that will become effective from a specified future date.

Elective

All undergraduate programs are required to have at least one 4.5 unit that is to be freely chosen by the student. Courses may be chosen from the list available on the University website, provided that any course prerequisite(s) are met.

Elective group

The pooling of more than one elective that a student can choose from.

Employer reserved place

A place in a program which is made available under an arrangement between the University and an employer or industry body. The arrangement limits or restricts enrolments in some or all of the places in the program to students sponsored by the employer or industry body.

Enabling Program

A course of instruction that enables a person to subsequently undertake a program leading to a higher education award. An enabling program is not a higher education award.

English language print dictionary

A dictionary that contains words in the English language, arranged alphabetically and expressed in English. It provides information about meaning, pronunciation, etymology (origin of the word) and inflected forms. It does not include a thesaurus, which is a book of synonyms (words having the same or similar meaning as another word) and antonyms (words having an opposite meaning of another word).

Enrolled student

A student who has load or approved leave for a program or a course recorded on the student record system on the census date for at least one study period in an academic year.

Enrolment

The process by which persons who have been admitted to a University program formally register to undertake one or more courses within their program as either commencing or continuing students.

Enrolment Confirmation Notice (ECN)

After the census date for each study period that students are enrolled in, all non-Commonwealth supported students will receive an ECN. The ECN will be available online through the myUniSA student portal. The ECN will show details of the student's enrolment at the census date including:

  • courses in which they are enrolled

  • tuition fees

Students must notify the University of any errors on the ECN within 14 days of the issue date on the notice.  Any errors will need to be reported to Campus Central using the Application for Post Census Correction of Enrolment Errors form.

Entry requirements

The rules that specify the level of attainment required to qualify for consideration for admission to university. Entry requirements can be standard or non-standard.

Equivalent Full-Time Student Load (EFTSL)

The measure used to determine a student's enrolled load. The University sets a unit value for each of its courses. One 'EFTSL' is the amount of student load determined by the University to be equal to a full-time load for one student for one year, and is expressed at the University as 36 units.

Evaluation and Re-accreditation Review (ERR)

All programs in the penultimate year of their accreditation period undertake a comprehensive evaluation in preparation for re-accreditation. This will result in an Evaluation and Re-accreditation Review Report. For more information see policy A-35A: Quality assurance and improvement: Programs, courses and teaching arrangements.

Evaluation of quality

This involves:

  1. the systematic consideration of stakeholder views and benchmarking activities about the quality of programs and the courses that comprise them; and

  2. the aggregation, analysis and interpretation of students' feedback about their perceptions of the quality of their courses of study to inform judgments about the quality of programs which incorporate those courses

For more information see policy A-35A: Quality assurance and improvement: Programs, courses and teaching arrangements.

Evaluation of viability

The evaluation of the viability of programs based on performance against an agreed set of indicators and referenced against University-based targets. For more information see policy A-35A: Quality assurance and improvement: Programs, courses and teaching arrangements.

Examination

A form of assessment whereby a student is required to undertake a specified academic task within a specified period of time, normally between one and three hours. The location of the examination and access to external assistance is also normally regulated.

Exchange Agreement

An international agreement that has been formalised between the University of South Australia and an overseas university or partner institution. For more information see policy  A-36: Student Mobility.

Exchange Program

A full study period exchange that is extended to domestic and international students to provide an opportunity for study at an overseas institution with an international exchange agreement. For more information see policy A-36: Student Mobility.

Exchange Student

A domestic or international student who participates in a Student Exchange Program that has been formally agreed between the University of South Australia and an overseas university or education provider. For more information see policy A-36: Student Mobility.

Exempt students

Students are exempt from paying student contribution amounts or tuition fees if they enrol in courses that:

  •   consist wholly of unsupported work experience in industry (WEI); or
  •  form part of a program for which the student has been awarded an exemption scholarship; or
  •  form a higher degree by research supported by a Research Training Scheme place; or
  •  form a higher degree by research supported by a fee-relief scholarship

Exemption

Release from specified parts of a course. It may be exemption from lectures, practicals, tutorials, projects or any other components of a course including elements of assessment. The exact requirements will be determined by the course coordinator.

Expected completion date

The date by which a student intends to finish their award.  Students can amend this date in UniSA’s online enrolment system.

Expected duration

The duration of the program as registered with the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS), and specified on the student's Confirmation of Enrolment. For the University's purposes, the expected duration will be based on the calendar year.

Extended Major

A stream of related courses which comprise more than 36 units, commonly 54 units (or 12 courses).

External mode

See Mode of Delivery.

External students

Students studying off-campus. Administrative services for external students are located at Campus Central.


F

FEE-HELP

An interest-free Commonwealth loan scheme that assists eligible fee paying students pay all or part of their tuition fees.  It is available to fee-paying undergraduate and postgraduate students who are Australian citizens undertaking at least part of their program of study in Australia, holders of permanent humanitarian visas, and holders of permanent visas undertaking bridging studies in Australia for overseas trained professionals.

Fee Paying Overseas Student (FPOS)

An overseas student for whom a fee is paid to the University. The fee is designed to recover the full cost of teaching and related services, administration and facilities. FPOS includes overseas students who are sponsored under Australia's foreign aid programs.

Fee paying postgraduate students (FPPS)

Domestic postgraduate coursework students who pay program tuition fees. Fees are subject to change on an annual basis. For more information see policy A-47: Student fees and loans.

Field of Education (FOE)

A classification of programs, specialisations and courses of study with the same or similar vocational emphasis or principal subject matter.

Fieldwork

Fieldwork is completed with an organisation or in an environment outside the University. The focus is on linking what is learnt in class with what is seen, collected and tested in the field. The specific aims of fieldwork may vary, but they usually include one or more of the following:

  • observing principles learnt in class as they appear in the field

  • applying what has been learnt in class to real situations

  • collecting information such as samples which can be used in class

Fieldwork assignments are generally associated with Natural and Built Environmental Sciences and related disciplines.

Flexible Learning Environment

A means of encouraging student engagement in learning activities. Creating a Flexible Learning Environment may include:

  • re-configured teaching spaces

  • ability to negotiate learning outcomes

  • choice of courses

  • delivery mechanisms and timing of delivery

  • online and off-campus delivery

Formative assessment

Helps students and staff to identify strengths, weaknesses and ways to improve and enhance learning attainment. Formative assessment is intended to improve outcomes rather than determine a final grade/mark. It may include (but is not limited to) written assignments, quizzes, reports, discussions or tests.

Foundation studies
A one year preparatory program offered by UniSA to help students gain the fundamental knowledge they need to enter an undergraduate program.

Full-time load

The standard annual full-time load is 36 units or 1.0 EFTSL (Equivalent Full-Time Student Load). A student undertaking at least 75% of a full-time load for the academic year will be full-time for that year. A student who is undertaking at least 75% of a full-time load, for either the first half or second half of the year, will be full-time for that half year.

Full-time student

A full-time student is undertaking at least 75% of a full-time load in an academic program. If a student is undertaking at least 75% of a full-time load for either the first half or second half of the year, they will be full-time for that half year. The normal annual full-time load is 36 units.


G

Grade

A qualitative descriptor used to signify a range of percentage marks or the status of a result where percentage marks are not applicable. Grades indicate the level of performance in a course against specified criteria and standards. Grades are awarded in all courses. The grading system for courses at the University can be found in Section 8 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The calculation of a student's average performance over a specified period, such as a teaching period, an academic year, or over the duration of the program. The calculation is based on the grade, the grade point value associated with that grade, and the unit value of each course. For more information see Section 8 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Graduand

A student who has qualified for an award but who has not yet had the award conferred.

Graduate

A student who has had an award conferred. This includes an honorary award and an award conferred jointly with another university or another body under Section 6 of The University of South Australia Act 1990.

Graduate Certificate

A postgraduate award of at least six month's duration full-time or its equivalent part-time, following the successful completion of an academic program.

Graduate Diploma

A postgraduate award of at least one year duration full-time or equivalent part-time, following the successful completion of an academic program.

Graduate Entry Bachelor Degree

A bachelor program where admission is restricted to graduates. These programs normally involve a minimum of one and a half years of full-time study or equivalent part-time study, following the satisfactory completion of a degree. They provide a professional level qualification for graduates.

Graduate Qualities

The University recognises that its graduates require particular qualities to enable them to participate in employment and the community. Seven graduate qualities identify a graduate of the University of South Australia. These qualities are developed through teaching and learning in courses and programs. For more information see Graduate Qualities.

Grant

An award selected on merit, including but not limited to academic merit, to assist a student to undertake a designated component of a program, such as a student placement or international exchange, or to assist with the initial costs of commencing university study. A grant is a one-off occurrence and may take the form of a payment made directly to the student or a reduction in a specified cost such as tuition fees. For more information see policy A-50: Coursework Scholarships and Prizes.


H

Hawke Ambassador Program

Typically 18 units (usually one study period) which may be counted towards nominated Bachelor degree programs. Students are based within an international non-government organisation (NGO), usually in an overseas location and work as volunteers rather than undertaking formal study at an overseas university.

HECS-HELP

A Commonwealth loan scheme that provides Commonwealth supported students with assistance in paying student contribution amounts for courses of study in which they are enrolled. Australian citizens and holders of permanent humanitarian visas are eligible for HECS-HELP. HECS-HELP loans are indexed each year in accordance with the Consumer Price Index.

Higher Education Loan Program (HELP)

A loans program administered by DIISRTE which enables students to defer some or all of the costs of their program. Loans available through this program include HECS-HELP, FEE-HELP, OS-HELP, SA-HELP and VET FEE-HELP.

Higher Doctorate

The award of Doctor of Letters or Doctor of Science. It is based on substantiated publications and/or the achievements of the candidate being recognised as a distinguished contribution to a field, resulting in an authoritative international standing.

Higher Education Provider (HEP)

A public or private higher education institution approved under the Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Cwth).

Honorary Degree

The award of Doctor of the University is made in recognition of:

  • distinction by the recipient in public service or service to the University, or

  • a distinguished contribution by the recipient to a field of academic endeavour

Honours Degree

A separate, stand-alone one-year program of advanced studies for students who demonstrate a high level of achievement on completion of their pass degree program (see policy A-42: Honours Programs).


I

Impact and compliance statement

A mechanism for assessing how a program proposal under consideration might impact on other elements of the University environment such as other programs.

Industrial placement

A work placement which is completed with an organisation outside the University. The focus is on applying what has been learnt at university in an industrial setting. Industrial placements are usually associated with Engineering and related disciplines.

Industry Association

A professional body representing a discipline which is not formally recognised as a profession. Professional practice standards and codes of conduct may be endorsed and promoted, but the association has no statutory authority.

Intensive mode

A form of course delivery which allows students to undertake and complete a course in a shorter period of time than the standard schedule allows for.

Internal accreditation

A term used by the University to indicate that a program has undergone an internal review and has approval to continue.

Internal program transfer

Enables a student admitted to, and enrolled in, a program of the University to apply for and be admitted to another program of the University at the same level or at a lower level, without needing to apply through the standard entry process, direct entry or the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre (SATAC).

International student

A student who is studying in Australia on a temporary visa, or a non-Australian citizen who is studying overseas via online or distance education. Students enrolled in a program delivered by an offshore partner are not considered international students. 

Invigilator

A staff member or approved nominee who is responsible for supervising examinations.


J

Joint program

A collaborative arrangement between recognised education providers, resulting in a single award. Such awards may include the co-badging of a single testamur. The inclusion of another university's details on University of South Australia parchments must be approved by Academic Board and University Council.


K

 Key Dates

 

Each course has three key dates: a census date, a withdraw date, and a withdraw-fail date. 

  •  Census date
    The census date is the last day on which a student may withdraw from a course and have it deleted from their academic record. Applicable fees and charges are incurred on the census date. Student records must be finalised on the census date in each study period.

 

  • Withdraw date
    The withdraw date is after the census date. It is the last day on which a student can withdraw from a course and have this recorded as ‘withdrawn’ on their academic record. A withdrawal does not contribute to program GPA.
  • Withdraw-fail date
    The withdraw-fail date is after the withdraw date. It is the last day on which a student can withdraw from a course and have it recorded as ‘withdrawn-fail’ on their academic record. Withdrawals after withdraw-fail date are recorded as ‘fail’ on the academic record.


L

Leave of absence

Leave of absence is a period of time during which a student is permitted to suspend their enrolment in an academic program. For more information see policy A-48: Enrolment.

Lecture

A formal presentation by an academic staff member, usually to a large number of students. Lectures may include the use of handouts and audio-visual presentations. Opportunities for asking questions or discussing the material being presented are usually limited.

Licensed/Franchised Programs

An offshore provider teaches an award of the University of South Australia in one or more locations, with quality assurance by the University.


M

Major

A stream of courses comprising 36 units (usually eight courses) which are related to each other in content and are usually studied in sequence (in some programs they may be called professional majors).

Mark

A quantitative value, often expressed as a percentage, awarded for an assessment task. For more information see Section 8 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Masters degree (by coursework)

An advanced program of study and research, designed to provide expert knowledge of a relevant field of study. The coursework component is expected to lead to the acquisition or enhancement of specific professional or vocational skills and knowledge. The research component is expected to provide an in-depth understanding of a particular field of academic or professional specialisation. For more information see policy A-49: Postgraduate Coursework Degrees with a significant research component.

Masters degree (by research)

A research postgraduate program of two years full-time duration (or part-time equivalent) leading to the award of Master of (Discipline).

Masters Level Double Degrees

The length of the contributing masters degrees will determine the length of a masters double degree program. The credit transfer policy of the University requires the completion of at least two thirds of the total units of a program while enrolled at UniSA to qualify for a UniSA masters degree. Masters double degrees will therefore be of varying length from 72 units to 96 units. For example:

  • combining two 54 unit awards would create a 72 unit double degree

  • combining a 54 unit award and a 72 unit award would create an 84 unit double degree

  • combining two 72 unit awards would create a 96 unit double degree

For more information see the Coursework Program Approval Manual.

Medical Certificate

A signed statement from a registered medical practitioner, health practitioner or approved health specialist which specifies the period of time during which the medical condition has, or will, affect the student's participation and/or attendance. Medical certificates are legal documents and must contain the practitioner's stamp. For more information see the Definitions section in the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Minor

A stream of courses within a program which are related in content and comprising up to 18 units (usually four courses). A minor is generally a subset of courses within a major and is not included on a student's parchment.

Mode of delivery

The manner in which a student is undertaking a program. There are two modes of delivery:

  • Internal mode includes face to face components such as lectures, tutorials, practicals, workshops or seminars that may be offered at a University campus, or delivered at another location. Courses delivered in internal mode may be offered as intensives which will allow them to be completed in a shorter period of time.

  • External mode includes online, distance education, industry placement or directed research. Virtual classrooms are deemed to be an external mode of delivery. External model does not normally include a face to face component, however some courses offered in external mode may require a small component of on-campus activity.

Moderated Program

An offshore provider teaches their program with quality assurance from the University of South Australia. Credit transfer is normally available on completion of the offshore program.

Moderation

A process for ensuring that consistency of marking occurs within courses and across the program, such that the same level of achievement is similarly rewarded. Moderation should demonstrate that markers make the same judgement at different points in time in relation to the same level of performance.

Monolingual LOTE programs

An offshore program where the medium of instruction and assessment is in a language other than English (for example Mandarin).

Mutual Recognition

An agreement between two or more countries or jurisdictions whereby a graduate qualification is reciprocally recognised by the relevant accrediting body(s) in each country or jurisdiction which is party to the agreement.

For example, Australia might recognise the qualification of graduates of a particular program completed in Malaysia, and Malaysia reciprocally recognises graduates of the equivalent program in Australia.

Mutual recognition may be automatically established through:

  • the program being accredited by a domestic accrediting body which has an reciprocal agreement already in place with an accrediting body(s) in another country or jurisdiction(s), or

  • the program being accredited by an international accrediting body which has jurisdiction over several countries

myEnrolment

The online system used by onshore students to enrol in coursework courses.


N

Nested programs

A suite of postgraduate programs, normally graduate certificate, graduate diploma and masters (but may extend to professional doctorate) where each lower award is a complete sub-set of the next award. Depending on the entry requirements, students may enter or exit the suite of awards at any level. For example, a student may progress upwards from the Graduate certificate, or may enter at the Masters level but exit with either a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma. An award for a higher level qualification automatically over-rides the lower level qualification.

Non-award enrolment

A type of single course enrolment where students enrol in one or more courses, but completion of the course does not count toward a program. Non-award students incur tuition fees and are not eligible for Commonwealth support.

Non-contact time

Non-contact time refers to the time that students are expected to give to study outside of lectures, tutorials and seminars. For example, library research, preparation for tutorials, reading and reviewing lecture notes.

Non-standard entry requirements

Any variation to the standard entry requirements. Variations must be justified in the program proposal documentation. See Entry requirements.

Normative assessment

A form of assessment where grades are awarded on the basis of a predetermined distribution. Each student's grade is determined in part by how well other students do in the same assessment task/course. The most common form of normative assessment assumes that grades/marks are distributed according to a standard distribution curve.


O

Offshore

UniSA activity outside Australia. Programs and courses which are offered offshore are not available to students studying in Australia.

Offshore student

A student who is undertaking a UniSA program in an offshore location under a collaborative agreement with a partner organisation, business or educational institution.

Ongoing Assessment

Assessment for the course continues in a subsequent study period or academic year. This is only applicable in research degrees.

Online course

A course delivered externally where all communication and access to/distribution of learning resources occurs electronically, usually via the internet.

Onshore

A program of study that is offered to domestic and international students either internally, externally or online, from any UniSA Campus.

Open book

An examination where any written or printed material is allowed in. No electronic devices are allowed.

Optional courses

Courses chosen from a limited range within a particular study area. These are usually listed in the program schedule which can be found on the program home page via the University website. They may be grouped together in an elective group.

Oral presentation

Involves a student presenting information to an audience (usually other students and /or academic staff) in verbal format. An oral presentation may be an assessment component for a course.

Orientation

A program of activities run at the beginning of the academic year which is designed to provide students who are new to the University with the information and support they need to become familiar with, and confident about, University life. The program may include online resources, workshops and a range of other activities.

OS-HELP (Overseas-HELP)

Loans that are available to eligible Commonwealth supported students who are normally based in Australia to enable them to undertake some of their study overseas as study abroad students. OS-HELP loans may be used to cover expenses associated with the overseas study, such as airfares, accommodation and other expenses. For more information see policy A-47: Student Fees and Loans.


P

Package of programs

This is where a prerequisite program is combined with a principal program of study. For example, students may need to undertake an English language program and/or another prerequisite program to meet the entry requirements for a principal program.

Parchment

The official certificate which a student receives when an award is conferred.

Partially online course

A course which is not solely and exclusively delivered online but which uses a range of ICT to deliver at least some aspects of the course.

Partner Institution

An organisation, in conjunction with whom the University offers a program of study or a component of a program of study. The organisation may be a private provider, a professional or industry association, a university or a college.

Part open book

An examination where nominated written or printed materials as specified on the examination timetable or examination paper are allowed in. No electronic devices are allowed.

Part-time student

A part-time student is a student undertaking less than the load specified for full-time status.

Pathway provider

A provider that delivers a prerequisite program.

Peer assessment

Students are given the opportunity to develop skills in making judgements on the quality of each other's work. The peer assessment will usually form part of the final assessment for the course.

Personal Information

Information or an opinion, whether true or not, and whether recorded in a material form or not, about an individual whose identity is apparent or can reasonably be ascertained from the information or opinion (as defined in the Privacy Act 1988 and the Higher Education Support Act 2003). For the purpose of University policy, 'personal information' means student personal information and includes assignments, examinations, individual student results, student results collated in a list with identification by student number, and practicum, field and clinical placement details.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a specific and serious form of academic misconduct, and includes:

  1. direct copying of the work of other persons, from one or more sources, without clearly indicating the origin. This includes both paper-based and electronic sources of material from websites, books, articles, theses, working papers, seminar and conference papers, internal reports, lecture notes or tapes, and visual materials such as photographs, drawings and designs

  2. using very close paraphrasing of sentences or whole passages without due acknowledgment in the form of referencing the original work

  3. submitting another student's work in whole or in part, where such assistance is not expressly permitted in the course outline

  4. use of another person's ideas, work or research data without acknowledgment

  5. submitting work that has been written by someone else on the student's behalf

  6. copying computer files, algorithms or computer code without clearly indicating their origin

  7. submitting work that has been derived, in whole or in part, from another student's work by a process of mechanical transformation (e.g. changing variable names in computer programs)

  8. in any way appropriating or imitating another's ideas and manner of expressing them where such assistance is not expressly permitted in the course outline

For more information see Section 9 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Postgraduate program

An advanced level academic program which is normally available only to a person who holds a bachelor degree or diploma.

Postgraduate student
A person who has already completed a university degree or diploma and is studying at university level for a higher level qualification.

Post nominal

The formal abbreviation of an award title.  For example Bachelor of Arts (Communication Studies) is abbreviated to BA(CommStud).

Practical

A practical is a learning opportunity which involves a brief presentation by the lecturer or tutor followed by students participating in various exercises or experiments. Practicals provide opportunities for interaction and discussion with the lecturer or tutor and fellow students.

Practice-based learning

All undergraduate programs are required to provide learning experiences which are directly linked to work contexts. The aim is to ensure that students have some understanding of the professional environment which they will eventually enter.

Practicum

A form of placement. Other forms of placement include clinical placement, fieldwork, a guided industry simulation or an industry project. Placements are a core element of many of the programs offered by the University. The learning from placements in both the rural and metropolitan areas provides students with a wide range of experience relevant to their professional award.

Preclusion (following academic review)

A student's enrolment is cancelled and re-admission to the academic program, or to an academic program at the same level in the same discipline, will normally not be considered for two years.

Re-admission to the academic program after preclusion will be through the normal admissions procedures and is not guaranteed. For more information see Section 10 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Preliminary or qualifying program

A higher education award that is an entry requirement for a subsequent award at the same undergraduate or postgraduate level. Preliminary or qualifying programs include:

a. Bachelor programs that are an entry requirement for a subsequent graduate-entry Bachelor or Honours program
b. Diploma programs that are an entry requirement for a subsequent Bachelor program
c. Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate programs that are an entry requirement for a subsequent Masters program.

An honours program is not a preliminary or qualifying program because it is not an entry requirement for a subsequent undergraduate award.

Prerequisite

A course or group of courses that must be passed before commencing a subsequent course. Prerequisites are listed on the course home page.

Primary Program Director

All programs require a program director to manage the program.  In cases where there is more than one program director, there must always be a primary program director who has final authority on program matters.

Prize

A prize acknowledges outstanding academic achievement in a course, group of courses or a program. Selection will be based on academic merit but may be restricted to certain groups of students in accordance with the University's equity objectives. A prize may take the form of a monetary reward, equipment, book voucher, or subscription to professional organisations. For more information see policy A-50: Coursework prizes and scholarships.

Profession

A group of individuals within a given discipline who are formally and publicly recognised as possessing specialised knowledge and skills derived from education and training at a high level, and who apply this knowledge and skills in the interest of others. It is inherent in the definition of a profession that a code of ethics governs the activities of the profession.

Professional accreditation

A formal process of assessment and review by a relevant accrediting body leading to formal recognition that a program meets the standards required to ensure that graduates possess the competencies necessary to begin professional practice.

Professional accreditation may include the requirement for graduates to gain formal registration with the relevant statutory body before they can begin professional practice.

Professional association

A regulatory body whose functions include monitoring and maintaining professional practice standards and codes of conduct for the profession. Depending on the profession, the association may also determine the requirements necessary for professional registration, approve courses for education and training, and investigate professional misconduct.

Professional Doctorate

A postgraduate award of three years full-time study or part-time equivalent which consists of a combination of advanced coursework and practice and a program of research. Leads to the award of Doctor of (Discipline).

Professional Major

See Major.

Professional recognition

Recognition by a professional association that a program meets industry standards and requirements. Recognition is on the basis of graduate qualification, and does not involve a formal accreditation process or a detailed review of the curriculum and other elements of the program. Graduates are eligible for membership of the professional association, but are not required to gain formal registration to begin professional practice.

Professional registration

Where professional registration is required, graduates of a program must gain formal registration with the relevant statutory body before they can begin professional practice.

Program

An approved combination of courses in which a student is enrolled during university study.

Program code

A four digit alpha code used to identify an academic program on the University's record system, e.g. MBAR. The first letter represents the campus (Magill), the second letter represents the program level (Bachelor) and the last two letters are an abbreviation of the program name (Arts).

Program Director

An academic staff member of the University, or an organisation with which the University has a formal contract, who is responsible for providing academic leadership of a program, including leading the program team and supporting students, as agreed in the contract.

Program Graduate Qualities Profile

A combination of the Graduate Qualities that are developed in the various courses in the program.

Program Objectives

These should embody a view of what kind of graduates the program seeks to produce.

Program owner

The school that owns the program into which the service course is being delivered. For more information see policy A-54: Service and collaborative teaching arrangements.

Program Schedule

Sets out the sequence of courses to be studied at each year level of a program. Programs should be designed to ensure that the courses students undertake expose them to progressively more complex aspects of the major themes in the program, and that the intellectual demands are sequenced developmentally. Levels of courses within a program should be differentiated by their complexity in content, demands in assessment, and in some cases prerequisite requirements.

Program Schedule Notes

Should include descriptive requirements of the program e.g.

  • clinical or field work / practice, industrial or practical experience requirements

  • projects, vacation reports

  • options or elective studies

  • part-time of full-time basis

  • other requirements e.g. driver's licence, medical examination, First Aid Certificate

  • special requirement  for external students e.g. attendance at intensive schools

  • groupings of courses into minors, majors, sub-majors and extended majors

Program Schedule Rules

Should include prescriptive requirements of the program e.g.

  • rules for progress through the program, if different from normal

  • credit

  • clinical / industrial codes of behaviour

Program transition

The process whereby the University, as a result of an approved program change, determines that a transition arrangement is required. Appendix A of policy A-45: Program Transition describes the administrative arrangements that are required to effect program and student transition.

Progressive assessment

Assessments that occur during the study period and prior to a final summative assessment.

Proscribed Fees

All fees charged to domestic students, other than student contribution amounts (for Commonwealth supported students), and tuition fees (for non-supported students), are proscribed under the Act (HESA 2003), with a number of specified exceptions. The only other fees that the University may charge enrolled domestic students are fees that are incidental to studies undertaken as part of the program that are payable in respect of:

  1. the provision of student services

  2. residential accommodation

  3. food, transport and accommodation for field trips, which the student can purchase from alternative providers

  4. special admissions test (for judging suitability of a person seeking admission into a specialist course

  5. non-award courses, or audit-only attendance at courses

  6. non-essential goods or services

  7. alternative forms of access to essential goods and services that are provided in other forms free of charge

  8. items that become the property of the student, that are not consumed during the course of study, and that may be purchased from alternative providers; and

  9. fines or penalties, such as overdue debts or library fees (provided the fees are imposed primarily as a disincentive, and are not levied to raise revenue or cover administrative costs)


Q

 


R

Reader

A collection of required readings such as articles or extracts from books and other sources which have been compiled by the lecturer for student use during a course.

Recognition of prior learning (RPL)

It is the policy of the University to recognise prior learning by granting credit towards the requirements of University award programs. The prior learning may be from:

  • a recognised higher education provider

  • a TAFE or other Vocational Education Training (VET) provider

  • a professional body, enterprise, private educational institution, or other similar body

  • work experience or other forms of practical experience, including voluntary work

  • life experience

For more information see policy A-13: Recognition of Prior Learning.

Record

Includes:

  • a document

  • a database (however kept)

  • a photograph or other pictorial representation of a person

but does not include:

  • a generally available publication

  • anything kept in a library, art gallery or museum for the purposes of reference, study or exhibition

  • letters or other articles in the course of transmission by post

Re-marking

An assessment task is marked again by a second assessor, without any further work by the student. The second assessor is not provided with details of the student's original mark. The same range of marks which were used on the original assessment must be available for re-marking. The second mark stands, whether it is higher or lower. No further re-marking will be permitted. For more information see Section 5 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Research enrolment

Student enrolment in a higher degree by research (HDR) program, including PhD, Masters by Research and those Professional Doctorate programs that contain more than 66% research.  

Research Training Scheme (RTS)

Provides Commonwealth-funding for research candidates to cover the cost of their tuition fees for the duration of their program, up to a maximum period of four years' full-time equivalent study for a Doctorate by research and two years' full-time equivalent study for a Masters by research. Research candidates who exceed the funded time may be liable to pay tuition fees to the University.

Research work

Any combination of a thesis, dissertation, and portfolio of work, exegesis, artefact, published articles or written project, as specified for the particular program.

Re-submission

A student is permitted to make substantial alterations, additions or amendments to an assessment task which they have failed. The assessment is then re-submitted to the original assessor within a specified timeframe. For more information see Section 5 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Result

For continuous assessment, a result is comprised of a grade and, where applicable, a percentage mark. For final assessment, a result is comprised of a grade only. The final result enables the University to certify a student's academic performance.


S

SACE Credits

 A year 12 student is required to achieve 200 credits to be awarded the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE). SACE subjects are either  1 unit (half year) or 2 units (full year).

SA-HELP
A loan scheme provided by the Australian Commonwealth Government that enables eligible students to defer the student services and amenities fee and pay later through the tax system. For more information, see the government webpage, Help Paying My Fees.

SATAC Code

The code assigned to an academic program by the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre and used by applicants on SATAC application forms.

Scholarship (Coursework)

 An award selected on merit, including but not limited to academic merit, to assist a student to undertake or complete a program of study at the University over a nominated period of time, in accordance with the selection criteria.  A scholarship may take the form of periodic payments to the student or a reduction in specified costs such as tuition fees for the duration of the scholarship. For more information see policy A-50: Coursework Scholarships and Prizes.

Selection

The mechanisms used to choose qualified applicants for admission to university.

Self-accreditation

Universities are 'self-accrediting'. This means that they have legislative authority to accredit their own programs and are responsible for their academic standards. Universities must have appropriate quality assurance processes in place, including peer assessment processes, external examination of higher degrees, and the involvement of professional bodies in the accreditation of particular programs.

Self assessment

A form of assessment where students are asked to assess their own work against a set of criteria. The self assessment may contribute to the overall student grade for that course.

Seminar

A gathering of a small group of students and a lecturer or tutor, and usually runs for 1-3 hours. A seminar usually includes a presentation by the lecturer or tutor or by a student or group of students. Students are expected to prepare for and participate actively in seminars by giving a paper, answering questions, or discussing subject matter in small groups.

Sensitive Information

Personal information about an individual's racial or ethnic origin, political opinion, membership of a political association, religious beliefs or affiliations, health status (either physical or emotional), disability, philosophical beliefs, membership of a professional or trade association, membership of a trade union, sexual preferences or practices, or criminal record.

Service Course

Any course included in a program in order to achieve the objectives of the program that is provided by a school other than the school that owns the program. For more information see policy A-54: Service and collaborative teaching arrangements.

Service Learning

A teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. While not all undergraduate programs at UniSA will provide opportunities for such learning, for many programs it does provide another avenue for engaging students in learning.

Service teaching

Any arrangement for the design and/or provision of a course or part of a course to students from another school in order to achieve the objectives of the program

Shared teaching

A specific arrangement where two or more schools agree to jointly own a course. This joint ownership is recorded on the course statement and student record system.

Short Program

A program of study that does not lead to the conferral of an award of the University. For more information see policy A-53: Short Programs.

Short term study or placement

Short term study or placement is available to undergraduate and postgraduate students and is designed to provide students with an international perspective to their program of study. Short term study or a short term placement is a negotiated path of study which must be approved by a Program Director. Students are eligible to apply for a UniSA travel grant if a minimum of 4.5 units of credit transfer have been approved. For more information see policy A-36: Student mobility.

Significant research component

A course or group of courses assessed solely on the basis of research work produced by the student, and which comprises at least one third but less than two thirds of the total EFTSL for that program. Research work that is not deemed under this definition to be 'significant' is managed as a coursework component under University policy. Programs with two thirds or more research are deemed to be research programs to be managed by research policies and regulations. For more information see policy A-49: Postgraduate coursework programs with a significant research component.

Single course enrolment

Refers to either non-award enrolment or audit enrolment, both of which are defined in policy A-48: Enrolment.

Special consideration

A form of secondary assessment which is granted to assist students to improve their final grade for a course, where completion of their final assessment was affected by unexpected or exceptional circumstances. For more information see Section 7 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Special Entry applicant

A person who does not meet the entry requirements for a particular academic program and is admitted through special entry provisions.

Specialisation

A component of an academic program which involves study in a particular aspect of a broad discipline area (e.g. Applied Geology within a Bachelor of Science). A specialisation is included on a student's parchment (see Academic Plan).

Student

A person enrolled at the University as an undergraduate or postgraduate student of the University.

Student contribution

The amount charged to Commonwealth supported students as a contribution towards the cost of their education. The University, in accordance with the Higher Education Support Act (HESA 2003), determines and publishes student contribution amounts on an annual basis. 

Student Engagement

All undergraduate programs at UniSA are designed to engage students actively in learning, rather than transmitting a body of knowledge.  The following three strategies are used:

These strategies are to be supported by the creation of a Flexible Learning Environment.

Student Exchange program

A full study period exchange that is extended to domestic and international students to provide an opportunity for study at an overseas institution with an international exchange agreement. For more information see the Student exchange website.

Student Identity Number (ID)

The unique number given to each student during the enrolment process. It is used as a means of identification for all official University purposes.

Student Mobility

Student mobility programs are designed to offer UniSA students academic and intellectual benefit through exchange between the University and overseas institutions. They are designed to foster internationalisation and create partnerships with overseas universities and education providers. Mobility programs may include formal Student Exchange Programs, study abroad, short term study or placement, study tours, and schemes such as the Hawke Ambassador International Volunteer Program. For more information see policy A-36: Student mobility.

Studies-in-lieu

Work specified or allowed where a student undertakes alternative work in place of a course scheduled in the program.

Studio session

A teaching period where students spend time in a studio learning environment.

Study Abroad

Enables students to study with an overseas provider when there is no formal exchange agreement. Domestic (outgoing) students who undertake study abroad are eligible to apply for OS-HELP but will be under the fee regime of the overseas institution in which they enrol. International (incoming) study abroad students are charged a fixed tuition fee for each study period, independent of load and the fee is set annually. The conditions that apply to OS-HELP are described in policy A-47: Student Fees and Loans.

Study period

The period of time during which all aspects of a course occur, including induction and orientation, reading, preparation, contact hours and assessment. It does not necessarily include secondary assessment, which may be scheduled outside of the study period.

Study Tour

Study tours are usually organised by a school or an academic staff member who may also be an accompanying participant on the study tour. Undergraduate and postgraduate (coursework) students who undertake study tours that have approved credit transfer are eligible to apply for a UniSA travel grant.

Sub-major

A stream of courses which are related to each other in content and are usually studied in sequence.  A sub-major is usually comprised of six courses. In some programs it may be referred to as a 'general studies sub-major'.

Summative Assessment

Provides information to judge the extent to which a student has achieved outcomes relevant to the Graduate Qualities in a course or program and is used to determine a final grade/mark. Summative assessment may take the form of examinations, written assignments, learnonline activities, reports, recitals, tests or other evaluations.

Supplementary assessment

Used as a secondary assessment to offer students an opportunity to gain a supplementary pass (SP) in a course approved for supplementary assessment. Supplementary assessment may involve an examination or other forms of assessment. For more information see Section 7 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Supplementary examination

See Supplementary assessment.


T

Teaching period

The period of time within a study period during which teaching activities such as lectures, tutorials, practicals, workshops and placements are scheduled. This is often represented by the start and end dates of scheduled classes.

Teaching-Research Nexus

The provision of learning experiences that foster connections between learning, teaching and research, and strengthen student development of the Qualities of a University of South Australia Graduate. At the core of the teaching-research nexus is the concept of critical enquiry.

There are many different types of learning environment which can be used e.g.:

  • capstone projects

  • open-ended investigative projects

  • projects in industry/professions

  • projects in research centres and institutes

  • problem-based activities

Terminating pass (TP)

A final grade which allows a course to be included in a student's progression through their program, but prohibits the course from being used as a prerequisite.  If a student wishes to continue with that stream of study, they can either seek permission to complete an alternative prerequisite, or accept a fail for the course and attempt it for a second time. For more information see Section 8 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

Tertiary Admission Subject (TAS)
Year 12 students need to gain a minimum number of TAS credits to be eligible for an ATAR or a TAFE selection score. Not all Year 12 subjects are recognised by universities for an ATAR.

Textbook

A book that contains material that is central to the understanding of a course. Students are normally required to purchase, or have continuous access to, text books which have been listed as learning resources for a course.

Transcript of academic record

An official record of a student's complete enrolment history at the University of South Australia, including a listing of all courses and results undertaken at the University, and details of degrees awarded and prizes achieved.

Transition Act

The Higher Education Support (Transitional Provisions and Consequential Amendments) Act 2003, and Ministerial Guidelines and Regulations issued under its authority.

Transition plan

Once Academic Board has approved a decision to withdraw, replace or significantly amend a program, the relevant school is responsible for developing a transition plan for each student (or group of students), and a communication plan for all students enrolled in the program. Campus Central is responsible for implementing the plan. For more information see policy A-45: Program Transition.

Transnational program

See Offshore.

Transnational student

See Offshore student.

Tuition Fee

The fee, other than the student contribution amount, that is charged for a course or program of study offered by UniSA. This includes non-award fees, international student fees, transnational student fees, cross-institutional fees for students who are not Commonwealth supported, fees for domestic research candidates who exceed their funded time, fees for domestic students in fee-paying places and Commonwealth supported undergraduate students who have exceeded their SLE (Student Learning Entitlement). It does not include other fees related to incidental costs.

Tutorial

A tutorial is a learning opportunity in which students discuss the key topics, concepts and ideas of the course with their tutors. Tutorials are closely linked to assessment and often involve small group discussions and group work. All students are expected to prepare for tutorials by reading required material and preparing questions and/or answers to questions. Students are also expected to participate actively in class discussions and small group activities. Tutorials complement the lectures given for a course and usually run for 1-2 hours.

Twinning Program

An arrangement where completion of the program requires both onshore and offshore study (normally through a standard transnational program arrangement).


U

Undergraduate program

An academic program of study leading to a qualification, such as an associate degree, diploma or bachelor degree. It includes an honours degree.

Undergraduate student
A student who is undertaking a program of study leading to an undergraduate award, such as a Diploma, Associate Degree or Bachelor Degree.

Unexpected and exceptional circumstances

Circumstances which were outside the control of the student and/or for which there was no opportunity to prepare in advance. For further information see Section 7 of the Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual.

 

UniSA Travel Grants

Available to undergraduate and postgraduate students who are approved to participate in UniSA student mobility programs. For more information see the Student exchange website.

 

Unit value

Represents the hours of student work required for a course. One unit represents approximately 35 hours of student work, including contact and non-contact time. The normal full time load is 18 units each half year or 36 units over a full academic year. A three-year degree requires 108 units.

University Calendar

The University Calendar is published annually in January and provides information on:

  • the structure of programs, including the requirement for satisfactory completion of the programs

  • schedules and course syllabuses for all programs offered in any particular year

  • majors, minors and undergraduate elective courses


V

 


W

Withdrawal date

(which is after the census date) is the last day on which a student can withdraw from a course and have it recorded as "withdrawn" on their academic record. The full cost of tuition fees or student contribution amounts is charged for all withdrawals made after the census date, including up to and after the withdrawal date. A 'W' notation does not contribute towards the calculation of a student's grade point average (GPA).

Withdrawal-fail date

(which is after the withdrawal date) is the last day on which a student can withdraw from a course and have it recorded as "withdrawn-fail" on their academic record. Withdrawals made after the nominated withdrawal-fail date are recorded as fail grades on the academic record and give no indication that the student withdrew rather than failed their assessment. The full cost of tuition fees or student contribution amounts is charged for all withdrawals made after the census date, including up to and after the withdrawal-fail date. A 'WF' notation contributes a grade point of 1.5 towards the calculation of a student's grade point average (GPA).

Workshop

A workshop usually involves a short introduction in which a specific problem is identified and presented to students by the lecturer or tutor. This is followed by discussion and activities in which students work collaboratively to investigate, analyse and formulate a solution to the problem. Outcomes may be presented by groups or by individual students at the completion of the workshop.


X

 


Y

 


Z

 



Areas of study and research

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