Clinical laboratory medicine

Clinical laboratory medicine

The Clinical laboratory medicine group conducts essential research exploring the biological mechanisms of thrombosis and haemostasis, angiogenesis, antimicrobial activity, and the toxic effects of cancer treatments.

Our Research

Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research

The Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research Group is led by Dr Brian Dale, and investigates the haemostatic system from both clinical and diagnostic aspects. This includes investigation of the pathophysiology of bleeding and thrombotic disorders and developing laboratory tests to aid in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment.

Vessels and Venoms Research

The Vessels and Venoms Research Group is led by Associate Professor Anthony Woods, and investigates tumour angiogenesis/vasculogenesis and the biology of tumour-derived blood vessels, and regulation of lymphatic growth (lymphangiogenesis). The lab also specialises in the effects of snake venom on endothelial cell biology, and regulation of snake venom formation and delivery.

Microbial Control Research

Microbial Control research is currently led by Dr Heather Rickard, and involves control of bacterial growth on surfaces and control of biofilms, clinical microbiology and diagnostics, antimicrobial activity of natural products, and antimicrobial resistance.

Mucosal Injury Research

The Mucosal Injury Research Group currently led by Dr Andrea Stringer explores primarily the digestive system, and its role in healthy and diseased states.  The focus of the group is the toxic effects of cancer treatments on the digestive system, including the role of oral and intestinal microbes, and analysis of new agents to combat these toxic effects.

Our capabilities

Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research

A variety of clot-based, turbidometric, chromogenic and fluorogenic techniques are used for routine and specialised coagulation assays including thrombin generation assays, overall haemostasis potential, platelet microparticle measurement and flow cytometry. A haematology analyser is also available.

Mucosal Injury Research

The Mucosal Injury group utilises both in vitro and in vivo assays.  The group uses a cell co-culture model to represent the mucosa using epithelial cells and a microbial ‘biofilm’, and has rat and mouse mucositis models for investigating the toxic effects of chemotherapy agents.  The model can be used for commercial studies to investigate the potential of new anti-mucositis agents.  The group uses histological, microbiological, molecular and protein assays.

Areas of study and research

+ Click to minimise