Chronic Disease - Cancer

2016

Effectiveness of interventions and programs before, during and after cancer treatments to enhance wellness and recovery. Prepared for Department of Health and Human Services

The International Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE) was commissioned by the Victorian Department for Health and Human Services (DHHS) to undertake a Rapid Review of published research and provide a synthesis of best available evidence on supporting the wellness and recovery of cancer survivors. The review considered types of interventions and their time-points, their effectiveness, particularly in the transition to the survivorship phase, and the optimal location for their delivery, in particular the comparison of community-based services with services co-located with hospitals.  

2016

Supportive Care Screening Instruments Report. Prepared for Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS), Victoria

This Rapid Review identified population-based screening instruments for application in any cancer setting, for any patient, in any stage of the cancer journey, relevant to physical, social, information, spiritual and/or psychological needs. The review focus was population-based screening instruments. However, there were important secondary findings in terms of assessment instruments that facilitated identification, triage and/or referral of patients to appropriate care/interventions; instruments that could improve patient outcomes and experience (quality of life), and instruments that could improve the management of identified needs of cancer patients. The Review team used a debating process to differentiate between population-screening instruments, and assessment instruments of individual needs related to age, type or stage of cancer, and quality of life (general measures, or measures specific to cancer type).

2014

A review of the evidence on barriers and enablers to improving the knowledge and experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer and their families. Prepared for Cancer Australia.  

The objective of this systematic literature review was to synthesise the evidence on barriers and enablers to improving the knowledge and experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer and their families. This review also examined approaches or strategies that have been used to improve the knowledge and experience in this population including key success factors associated with effective interventions. Some of the review questions include:

  1. What are the barriers and enablers to improving the knowledge and experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer and their families?
  2. What existing strategies or approaches are currently in place to improve their knowledge and experience, and what are their outcomes?
  3. What is the evidence of effectiveness of interventions and approaches for improving their knowledge and experience following a cancer diagnosis?
  4. What are the key features or characteristics (such as parameters) of effective interventions and approaches (i.e. key success factors)?
  5. What are the barriers (e.g. health literacy) to the effectiveness and uptake of interventions aimed at improving the experience and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer?
  6. What innovative and/or technological approaches have been used to effectively engage Indigenous Australians?
  7. What are the literature and knowledge gaps in improving the experiences and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer and their families? 

2010

Process and outcomes of multidisciplinary teams in assessment and treatment of patients with cancer. Prepared for Centre for Rural Health and Community Development.

Cancer care is complex and therefore a multidisciplinary team approach has been recognised as standard practice in high-quality management of cancer (as with any chronic illnesses). However, it is important that multidisciplinary approaches are also underpinned by the best available research evidence. The purpose of this review was to provide a synthesis of the best available research evidence on processes and outcomes of multidisciplinary teams in cancer care, using a systematic review framework.  


Areas of study and research

+ Click to minimise