Our Irrigation Research Students

Masters students

Rayan Jamali 

Rayan is a Masters candidate investigating soil salinity build up in almond crops irrigated by both recycled waste water and ground water. This research investigates techniques for minimising build-up of salinity in the root zone using different irrigation management methods. 

Phd students

Oliver MD Moinul Hosain 

Oliver is a PhD candidate investigating the issues associated with the use of recycled water and dripper emitters.  The objective of Oliver’s research is to understand the conditions that lead to premature clogging of emitters and ways to prevent it. 

Full project abstract

Hamideh Nouri 

Hamideh is a PhD scholar and tutor at CWMR. Her research investigates sustainable irrigation and nutrient management for urban landscape plants associated with reclaimed wastewater. Hamideh’s project includes a comprehensive review of different evapotranspiration measurement methods for determining the water requirements of urban vegetation. 

Full project abstract

Mostafa Razzaghmanesh 

Mostafa is a PhD candidate at the CWMR and his research is in the area of Water Sensitive Urban design (WSUD).  In his research, he is looking for specific design criteria that need to be developed for the range of South Australian climate conditions in order to develop resilient green roofs.

Full project abstract

Abdullah Abdulmohsen Alrajhi 

Abdullah is PhD candidate investigating deficit irrigation using recycled waste water on tomato plants.  Abdullah’s investigation is to minimise the use of recycled water for irrigating tomato crops with the objective of reducing leaching beyond the root zone to groundwater.

Full project abstract

Shiv Umapathi

Shiv Umapathi is a PhD scholar at CWMR and research fellow at the CSIRO and the Goyder Institute. Her research investigates the water-energy footprint of urban dwellings representative of future environmentally sustainable housing developments using in-depth monitoring methods. 

Full project abstract

Premila Semananda

Premila is a PhD candidate and her research focuses on developing a sustainable irrigation system to increase the water use efficiency based on wicking bed technology. 

Full project abstract


Full Abstracts

Oliver MD Moinul Hosain 

Project Title: Dynamics of drip emitter clogging in relation to soil thermal variation

Emitter clogging is common in sub-surface drip irrigation (SDI) schemes. In recycled water irrigation, clogging is associated with bio-fouling due to microbial growth inside the emitter flow path. It is believed that thermal variation in subsurface soil can potentially affect the clogging mechanism. Oliver is investigating the bio-fouling process under a range of thermal regimes. The study is expected to produce a non-chemical solution to optimize the occurrence of clogging in subsurface emitters. It will also contribute towards formulating a new emitter sensitivity test procedure for subsurface emitters.

Oliver Hosain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hamideh Nouri 

Project Title:  Sustainable irrigation and nutrient management for urban landscape plants

Hamideh is a PhD scholar and tutor at CWMR. Her research investigates sustainable irrigation and nutrient management for urban landscape plants associated with reclaimed wastewater irrigation. Hamideh’s project includes a comprehensive review of different evapotranspiration measurement methods for determining the water requirements of urban landscape plants. In her first journal paper, Hamideh reviewed the most reliable approaches for ET estimation for urban vegetation. In the second review paper, she reviewed remote sensing techniques for predicting evapotranspiration from urban parklands. The study focused on three major evapotranspiration estimation techniques, namely: observational approaches using field-based adjustment factors, a soil water balance and remote sensing (RS). Veale Gardens within the Adelaide Parklands has been selected as the study area. Three observational-based adjustment factors for reference evapotranspiration were calculated and used to compare predicted and actual irrigation rates provided by the local water authority. The third journal paper described the outcomes of this approach in details. In fourth journal paper, hyper spectral WorldView-2 images were used to model vegetation indices and its relationship to temporal urban landscape evapotranspiration In order to determine in-situ evapotranspiration and to monitor the nutrient loads associated with the reclaimed wastewater irrigation, three lysimeters and eleven Neutron Moisture Meter (NMM) probes were installed. Data analysis is in-progress. The nutrient removal performance and solute leaching in heterogeneous urban vegetation environments was also investigated and published in as a journal paper.

Hamideh 1 Hamideh 2

Mostafa Razzaghmanesh 

Project Title: Developing resilient green roofs for Adelaide

Mostafa Razzaghmanesh is a PhD candidate at CWMR.  He graduated in 2001 with a Bachelor of Water Engineering and then obtained his Master’s Degree in 2004.

He considers Australia to be one of the most urbanized countries in the world with 85% of its inhabitants living in towns or cities. Urban growth and increases in impervious areas have resulted in many problems for urban environments. Green roofs, as a Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) system, can provide environmental, economic and social benefits for communities.

To consider the benefits of green roofs, three experiments have been set up. The first site is located on the roof top of ANZ House in the Adelaide CBD.  The main research issue for this experiment was to investigate stormwater quality from the Green roof’s run off. The second experiment replicated the ANZ House green roof trials on a medium scale for further investigation of outflow water quality, quantity, plant performance and Urban Heat Island mitigation potential of green roofs.  This experiment was constructed at UniSA’s Mawson Lakes Campus. The third experiment also located at UniSA Mawson Lakes, is being undertaken in sixteen experimental plots. The findings from these three experiments will be used for a study to cover buildings in the Adelaide CBD with green roofs using ENVI-met 3D Model.

Mostafa also has sound knowledge of HEC-RAS and EPA-NET models. Some examples of the projects that Mostafa has been involved with are Trangie Nevertire and Murrumbidgee Irrigation Modernization located in NSW, Groote Island Pipeline in the NT and the Willunga Basin Pipeline in SA.

Mostafa 1 Mostafa 2

 


Abdullah Abdulmohsen Alrajhi 

Project Title: Partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation for sustainable production and environmental protection using recycled wastewater. 

Abdullah is PhD candidate investigating deficit irrigation using recycled waste water on tomato plants.  Abdullah’s investigation is to minimise the use of recycled water for irrigating tomato crops with the objective of reducing leaching beyond the root zone to groundwater.

Achieving an optimum yield and minimizing the environmental impacts of Recycled Waste Water (RW) will help sustainability in the agricultural sector. Many studies have investigated the effect of wastewater irrigation on plant growth and soil characteristics in agricultural and horticultural production systems. Different irrigation techniques have also been investigated in order to achieve maximum water use efficiency (WUE).

It is clear that water scarcity is the most important limiting factor for the sustainable development of many nations. In Australia water shortage is the most limiting factor to economic growth in the horticultural sectors. Therefore, improving water-use efficiency will reduce water consumption. Also using alternative water resources such as RW, especially for the agricultural sector is a strategic choice for sustainable water management.

In this study tomato plants were irrigated with three different water sources RW, shandied water (SW) delivered to Mawson lakes area for landscape use (SW is a mixture of storm water and recycled wastewater from Bolivar wastewater treated plant - north Adelaide) and tap water (TW) as a control with five different irrigation scenarios. 

Abdullah Alrajhi

 


Shiv Umapathi 

Project Title: Water-energy footprint of urban dwellings 

Shiv Umapathi is a PhD scholar at CWMR and research fellow at the CSIRO and the Goyder Institute. Her research investigates the water-energy footprint of urban dwellings representative of future environmentally sustainable housing developments using in-depth monitoring methods. The research will be based on a sustainability-focussed development in Adelaide wherein the dwellings are designed and built to utilise alternative water sources such as roof collected rainwater and treated stormwater supply in order to reduce the demand on traditional potable mains water. The development also boasts several water sensitive urban design features while the dwellings themselves have water-saving fixtures, appliances and in-home water-energy consumption monitoring systems. The research will utilise extensive monitored data (of water use and the energy use associated with water use) to understand the water-energy footprint of 1) up to 83 detached dwellings with individual rainwater tank systems, hot water systems and communal recycled stormwater systems, 2) up to 23 apartment dwellings (in clusters of 3 - 4 homes) with communal rainwater, hot water and stormwater systems and 3) the residential development as a whole. The research will conduct a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the relationship between the economic and environmental impacts associated with using water efficient technologies over energy efficient water technologies corresponding to urban residential developments. As these types of developments are relatively new, analytical assessments to determine their actual water-energy reliability as models for future developments are limited. Hence, the study will provide important evidence-based information that will be valuable for all future urban residential developments in order to help regulators and builders to make informed decisions.

 Shiv Umapathi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: In-home energy and water monitoring system at a model home, Metered mains water (blue) and recycled stormwater (purple) supply to the individual dwellings, Apartments with roof-connected rainwater downpipes.


Premila Semananda

Project Title: Developing a sustainable irrigration system to increase water use efficiency

Premila is a PhD candidate and her research focuses on developing a sustainable irrigation system to increase the water use efficiency: based on wicking bed technology. Premila will work closely with community gardens in South Australia and Sri Lanka by introducing the system to gardeners as a sustainable irrigation method to secure the scarce water resources. The system also will be introduced to the community of those who lived in urban cities, to adopt into their lifestyles, as a self-sufficient food growing method and which can also be used as a hobby to grow vegetables.  

Premila Semananda

 

Areas of study and research

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