Whyalla Programs

Whyalla Programs

UniSA Connect programs for secondary school students connect with science, technology, engineering, mathematics and career information. All programs are supported by the University of South Australia and are offered free of charge for students (unless otherwise advised).

At the Whyalla campus, UniSA Connect will be conducting

  • STEM Innovation Experience

The STEM Innovation Experience (STEMIE) aims to increase STEM engagement in schools and increase awareness of STEM in the wider community. This is achieved through students’ participation in a series of STEM-based tasks linked to curriculum.  

STEMIE has three major components - a Learning Phase, the STEMIE Regional Showcase, which then culminates with the STEMIE State Final.

  • STEM Girls

A learning and networking opportunity for Year 11 girls studying Science and Mathematics who wish to explore STEM careers. STEM Girls aims to support young women to continue studying Science and Mathematics through their schooling and into university.

The girls will be invited to participate in two inquiry based learning days at UniSA ­- a STEM Girls Networking Dinner and a full day Industry Tour.

  • STEM Days

UniSA connect will be at Whyalla campus on

Connect to Humanitarian Careers

  • Thursday 31 May

Mechatronics

  • Friday 1 June

Networks and 3D Printing

  • Wednesday 22 August
  • Thursday 23 August
  • Friday 24 August

Connect to Humanitarian Careers STEM Day

(31 May)

The Connect to Humanitarian Careers STEM Day shows students how engineering careers can improve quality of life for people all over the globe. Students will also analyse their own skills and personality styles to investigate their own career pathway options.

For year 10 students

Session 1 - Career Awareness Program

The Career Awareness Program (CAP) is designed to enhance the Year 10 SACE Personal Learning Plan (PLP) subject.  The CAP engages with secondary school students to raise awareness and aspirations for higher education.

This program utilises the My Career Match profile which allows students to determine their skills, abilities, strengths and personality style.  The profile can assist students to identify future careers, study pathways and can also be linked to some PLP curriculum tasks.

Session 2 -  STEM for Humanity

Many people around the world struggle to survive on less than two dollars a day. STEM for Humanity explores some ways that Scientists and Engineers can work with communities in developing countries to support and improve their lives, in a manner that is sustainable within the community.

The students work in small groups, with each group assuming the role of an engineering team working in one of a number of developing countries. Their task is to produce a water filter, made from everyday materials, that can convert dirty water to cleaner water. The filters are presented, tested and evaluated.

The program concludes with a presentation of successful engineering projects in developing communities, to show how engineering can and does improve people’s lives, and profiles some of the groups that undertake this important work.

Conditions

As this program is a practical activity, students and accompanying adults will be required to wear closed shoes and appropriate dress

Teachers will receive confirmation of booking and pre-visit information

This program requires a minimum of 15 to attend, and has a capacity of 25 students.

Mechatronics STEM Day

(1 June)

The mechatronics STEM day is an introduction into the world of engineering. Mechatronics combines several engineering fields including electronics, mechanical engineering and computer engineering in a multidisciplinary style that is growing in popularity and demand. In this program students focus on design techniques, including 3D printing, and electronics, including soldering and identifying circuit components.

For year 10 and 11 students

This full day program consists of two sessions:

Session 1 – 3D printing

This session is an introduction into the 3D printing process. Students will explore the uses and applications of this additive manufacturing technique, watch 3D printers in action and design their own 3D printed object using CAD-based software.

Students will learn the basic functions of CAD software and progress through a series of tutorials to become skilled in basic 3D modelling. They will then create their own 3D printed object, within specific guidelines, suitable for printing

Please note: due to the 3D printing time, the student designed objects are usually printed after the session and posted to the school.

Session 2 - Electronics

This session in an introduction into electronics. Students will practise soldering techniques whilst developing their ability to identify and understand the function of electronic circuitry components.

Students will assemble and construct a “Music Matcher” electronic kit developed by the University of South Australia. This kit consists of a one-octave electronic keyboard as well as a memory and reaction timer game. Students will keep their completed kits at the conclusion of the day.

Conditions

As this program is a practical activity, students and accompanying adults will be required to wear closed shoes and appropriate dress

Long hair will need to be tied up on the day

Teachers will receive confirmation of booking and pre-visit information

This program requires a minimum of 15 to attend, and has a capacity of 25 students.

Networks and 3D printing STEM Day

(22, 23, 24 August)

The networks and 3D printing STEM day looks at some of the real-world applications of mathematics, including the use of networks for train scheduling and disease control. It also focusses on the application of 3D printing technology and the use of CAD programs to improve manufacturing processes.

For year 10 and 11 students

Session 1 – Networks

This session looks Euler’s Rule and how it can be used to solve real world network problems such as train timetabling, postal deliveries and disease control. Students will solve a variety of network problems and recognise Euler paths and cycles.

Session 2 – 3D printing

This session is an introduction into the 3D printing process. Students will explore the uses and applications of this additive manufacturing technique, watch 3D printers in action and design their own 3D printed object using CAD-based software.

Students will learn the basic functions of CAD software and progress through a series of tutorials to become skilled in basic 3D modelling. They will then create their own 3D printed object, within specific guidelines, suitable for printing

Please note: due to the 3D printing time, the student designed objects are usually printed after the session and posted to the school.

Conditions

As this program is a practical activity, students and accompanying adults will be required to wear closed shoes and appropriate dress

Teachers will receive confirmation of booking and pre-visit information

This program requires a minimum of 15 to attend, and has a capacity of 25 students.

Bookings

A negotiated day for schools that can be tailored to suit.

Areas of study and research

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