“Teaching and learning on the edge: Policy and practice for education in marginal communities”

17 November 2016

Location

H1-44 Amy Wheaton Building
Magill Campus
5pm - 7pm

Centre for Research in Education
(CREd) Oration 2016
presented by Professor Jo-Anne Reid, Charles Sturt University

Followed by a Reflective Response from UniSA Early Career Researchers
Dr Lisa O’Keeffe, Dr Garth Stahl, Mr Sam Osborne and Dr Hannah Soong

This oration will focus on the problems that face (teacher) education policy and practice in attempting to understand and respond to the need for schooling to support Tony Vinson’s (2015) call for us all to face the ‘challenge of persistent and entrenched locational disadvantage, no matter how difficult it may be to solve‘. Dropping off the Edge 2015 has shown that complex and entrenched disadvantage continues to characterise a small number of communities across Australia and that significant numbers of those have shown few signs of improvement in the past 15 years.  There is a high proportion of disadvantaged localities in rural areas in all Australian states and they pose an enormous challenge to policy makers and service providers, as well as to the members of the communities themselves. In such contexts, education is both crucially important and inexorably difficult.  Arguing that we need to understand locational disadvantage as a wicked problem for a social equity agenda (Vinson et al. 2015), I work with the concept of Rural Social Space (Reid et al. 2010) as a theoretical resource for understanding place. I draw on what I am calling an exemplary case (Bourdieu 1999) of just one community to examine what a wicked problem looks like for social equity in the present time-space.  The example allows me to consider the sorts of policy and practice responses that may be necessary if we are ever to address the wicked problem of locational disadvantage in rural social space.”

Professor Jo-Anne ReidProfessor Jo-Anne Reid is Presiding Officer of Academic Senate and Professor of Education. She was previously Associate Dean, Teacher Education in the Faculty of Education. A graduate of the University of Queensland, she worked first as a secondary English teacher, and became a Curriculum Advisory Consultant for rural teachers in WA before being appointed to Curriculum Branch in that state. From there she moved to Murdoch University completing her PhD at Deakin. She has worked as a literacy teacher educator in two other regional universities (Ballarat, New England) and is committed to improving the preparation of teachers for schools in rural and remote locations. She joined Charles Sturt University in 2002 as Head of the School of Teacher Education.

 

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