While you were sleepwalking: A review of the science of somnambulism

14 October 2016

Location

UniSA
Amy Wheaton Building,
Magill Campus,
St Bernards Road, Adelaide.


Room H1-44

3.00pm – 4.00pm


Presented by: Dr Helen Stallman

Abstract:

Sleepwalking has long held a fascination–the strange nocturnal wanderings of people who are actually asleep.  It most prominently comes to the attention of the general public when a person uses sleepwalking as a defence for murder or when the sleepwalker is seriously injured.  This presentation will provide an overview of the science of sleepwalking including highlighting the recent research conducted by Dr Stallman and her team in the areas of epidemiology, medication-induced sleepwalking and violence during sleepwalking.

 

Dr Helen StallmanDr Helen Stallman is a Senior Lecturer at the University of South Australia and a member of the Centre for Sleep Research. She also holds an Honorary Senior Research Fellowship at The University of Queensland.

A Brisbane-born Clinical Psychologist, Dr Stallman is a specialist in the development and evaluation of interventions aimed to improve mental health and wellbeing, particularly in the fields of parenting, university student mental health, and e-psychology. More recently, she has also done significant work in the science of sleepwalking.

The quality and impact of Dr Stallman’s research has been recognised with a number of awards including UniQuest Trailblazer, the Griffith University Primary Health Care Research Evaluation & Development Writing Bursary, Queensland Mental Health Week Achievement Awards - Service/Program category, ANZ Mental Health Services Achievement Award, The University of Queensland Faculty of Health Sciences Award for Programs that Enhance Learning and the International Education Association of Australia (IEAA) Award for Best Practice/Innovation.

The Sleepwalking study is currently looking for participants:
To find out more visit: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/sleepwalking

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